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Author Topic: musicians write about jason  (Read 103217 times)

trialsanderrors

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musicians write about jason
« on: March 19, 2013, 10:56:07 AM »
i've seen a number of comments, anecdotes and memories by fellow musicians pop up on various sites, so it might make sense to collect them here. please feel free to post any you might find. the first one is by steve albini:

I loved hearing Jason Molina sing. He was a genius at turning a phrase and making it into something more than the words in it. Jason was almost supernaturally prolific, and several times I watched him write an album's worth of songs in a weekend, recording them on the spot. Much of his recorded output with Magnolia Electric Co is the evidence of him and the band playing his songs for the very first time. It's amazing, really, that it was any good at all, much less so touching and fully realized.

Jason was a unique talent and I will miss him. My heart goes out to all his friends and family, all of you I've met have been good people who did well by Jason.

trialsanderrors

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2013, 10:59:05 AM »
howe gelb on facebook:

very sad to hear of jason's passing. we'd only met twice .. once on a short tour together .. and another time at the rock n roll hotel (furstenhof) in vienna when we were playing the same night at different venues and had split the our crowds in doing so .. the next morning he handed me a scrawl of lyrics to use if i needed them which i found a sweet unforgettable gesture. i only sat in with his band one night when i was feeling sad and lost in chicago and accidentally came upon them at shuba's .. . and the jam brightened up my existence instantly. we were of the same cut in this realm of sonic murk, wondering where the likes of us ever fit in .. and we were both tickled that we had discovered scout niblett separately, but him beating me by 5 minutes and delivering her to his friends at secretly canadian records .. and i instantly loved him for that. that said .. i had no idea he was sick or needed any assistance and now am dreadfully saddened by his loss. may his transition be a seamless one and the next realm a welcoming heavenly splendor.

trialsanderrors

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2013, 11:00:52 AM »
shearwater's jonathan meiburg on facebook:

I'm saddened to hear about Jason Molina's passing. We toured with him twice back in the old days, and he was both victim and perp of the grandest and silliest exchange of tour pranks I ever saw. Thoughts are with old friends, the Magnolia crew especially.

trialsanderrors

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2013, 11:04:52 AM »
glen hansard on twitter:

I lost a true friend today, it hurts, but it is, Jason Molina gave me so much. Hope, a song, protection spells. He put The Frames on course. Gave us a confidence.  A truly great artist, go listen to the first Songs: Ohia record, heartbreaking folk blues.. He died in the grip
  • f the bottle.. I'll miss him and take him with me always.. In my song, and voice, his gift was free.. Never held back.. Sleep soft JMo x


trialsanderrors

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2013, 11:27:32 AM »
christine owman on facebook:

Sadly we've lost a great artist - Jason Molina. I always wanted to work with him and thought I'd ask him some day. But he got sick and unfortunately passed away. I've been up all night recording my first cover ever. This is my way of saying thanks for sharing such magical music with the world. Rest in peace Jason.
http://snd.sc/ZODjLX

iheartschlitz

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2013, 01:00:04 PM »
Damien Jurado through twitter:

"I will be gone, but not forever" - Farewell Transmission Jason Molina - tour mate, inspiration and friend - you will be greatly missed.

iheartschlitz

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2013, 01:19:30 PM »
Timothy Showalter (Strand of Oaks)


I bought Magnolia Electric Company the day it came out.  I had just escaped to Pennsylvania after some really bad times.  I had listened to Songs:Ohia for years and had already started to try and write songs like him.  But Magnolia meant something so much more.  I was in a new town and on the verge of losing my mind.  This record and the accompanying demo cd were played like a prayer.  I actually couldn’t stop listening to it.  My mind does that from time to time.  I get trapped like a record skipping and need routine and safety.  Jason’s voice was so sad but also the most comforting thing in the midst of such a dismal situation.  I listened to it when I woke up and when I went to sleep and everything else in between.  It took me a long time to get over 2003 probably too long.  But I made it through and I’ll never be able to comprehend how much this record helped me.  I play music now because all I ever wanted to do was to write a song half as good as Jason.  In a way Strand of Oaks is just one long tribute to his work.  I never got to tell him this personally but hopefully he passed away knowing how important he was to those that loved him.  It’s been ten years since I bought that record and so much life has happened.  Good and bad.  But today I lost my hero.  I’m always in debt to Jason Molina beyond what I can describe here.  These words below are just one of many that healed so much in my life.  Rest in Peace brother.

got my window open in the southern cross hotel
it’s been my longest night i can tell
by the way i’m not surprised
to see the desert cover over paradise

now count every rhododendron in this cool mountain light
i made more mistakes than that just tonight
so all of you folks in heaven not too busy ringing the bell
some of us down here ain’t doing very well
some of us with our windows open in the southern cross motel

still waitin
still waitin

for you to sing that song again
the one you were singin at the very fall of man
it ain’t hallelujah but it might as well have been

sing it brother one more time
sing it brother one more time
sing it sister one more time
sing it sister one more time

once for everybody who got left behind
whip-poor-will
oh whip-poor-will
whip-poor-will

ksuwdboots

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2013, 01:26:44 PM »
Samantha Crain on Facebook:

I found The Lioness in a bargin bin at Size Records in Oklahoma City when I was 17. The cover looked weird. Purple sky, palm trees. No lion. I had to get back to Shawnee and I had to pee so I grabbed it and payed the man 5 bucks. Back then, in high school, before being a touring musician that writes records had even entered my brain, I was a music loving kid with a cool car (cherry red 1967 Ford Mustang), not many friends, and a penchant for driving around--just driving around Pottowatomie and Lincoln county with no destination, burning gas and time. I got going on Interstate 40 and once I was clear of Midwest City, past the air force base, I popped the CD in my cheap blue neon glowing after market CD player in car. It was dawn, my speakers were loud, and then, I hear it. The heavy sparse chords of "The Black Crow" rang through me, filling all the dark air in the cab of the car. Then his voice, this Jason Molina guy, yelps out, sounding like he is lying on the concrete outside a gas station at night, bleeding out of a wound. For 7 minutes, this song terrified and comforted me and, ever since then, I've been buying Jason Molina albums, Songs: Ohia albums, and Magnolia Electric Co. records. And when I started writing songs, I began speaking to Jason through an imaginary comradery, replying to him in my own music. He has been the single most influential musician to me and I am overwhelmed with saddness at his passing. I had felt something additional in the past year while listening to his records, something different and eerie. It felt like I was hearing the music of a ghost and so, last year, I wrote "For the Miner" pleading with him "don't go now". Perhaps I expected too much of him. I even feel guilty in a strange way. I loved his music, his pleading voice, his jangly guitar, his winced face, and most of all his candor. I am, in a huge way, a musician because I wanted to connect with him in his own language. I will miss you Jason Molina.

iheartschlitz

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2013, 01:28:04 PM »
Aidan Moffat (Arab Strap) through a series of tweets:


I didn't know what to say earlier, I was letting it sink in, but Jason Molina's death this weekend is heartbreaking ...

... I shared a lot of stages with him – and Travelodges and motels too – from the very first Arab Strap US tour in 1998 onwards ...

... I even helped him make an album once. He was as brilliant a guy as he was a songwriter, and knowing we'll never hear him sing again ...

... is a true tragedy. Here he is, singing one of my all-time favourite songs, unaccompanied: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGN2FHgww24




ksuwdboots

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2013, 01:29:14 PM »
Josh Ritter on Twitter:

So sorry to hear of Jason Molina's passing. He was an artist in the truest sense of the word. Uncompromising, generous, bold and loving.

noloveforned

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2013, 02:32:33 PM »
a post from jens lekman

Jason Molina passed away two days ago. I didn't know him well but we met a few times. The first time we met was during thanksgiving 2004 in Bloomington, Indiana where our recordlabel Secretly Canadian have their office. In a backyard behind a house Jason showed me his broken guitar that he had placed in a tree there years earlier. The guitar and the tree had grown together, the tree slowly swallowing the guitar as it's stem grew around it. Jason was sweet, friendly. I didn't get a chance to tell him how much I loved his records.

The second time I met him was backstage at a show. I came back to say hi. He didn't say anything, just looked at me, smiled and started a playing a song. Then he gave me the guitar and said "your turn". So I played a song and then said "your turn again". And we just stood like that for a while, taking turns playing songs for each other. I didn't get a chance to tell him how much I loved his records that time either.

I never got a chance to tell him how that first album of his opened my mind. I was sixteen, I put some american dollars in an envelope and sent it over the sea. Two weeks later it arrived, I didn't know music could sound that close. I followed his every move for years, bought every little strange seven inch and "tour only" CD. I'm sitting here now with those records spread out across the floor. I never grew tired of Jason's songs because they don't belong to a time but rather a place. I don't think I've ever heard music be so geographical. It's not a place I've ever seen on a map, it's a hut in a dark rainforest, a savannah in the sunset, a freeway with no traffic signs. A place no satellites has ever laid their eyes on but your GPS tells you "you have reached your destination".

iheartschlitz

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2013, 02:59:40 PM »
Beirut on facebook:

We are very saddened to learn of the death of Jason Molina. A truly great artist that has brought so much to the world. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. Please, take a moment out of your day and listen to some of his amazing music.

idlehhhand

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2013, 05:41:24 AM »
the first one is by steve albini:

from the same thread. Albini's wife (i think) Heather talks about how Jason and the band were recording there when Silkworm's Michael Dahlquist was killed and shares a song Jason wrote for them that day.

http://www.electricalaudio.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=1630653#p1630653

Jason was recording with Steve when Michael was killed in 2005. He generously gave up his time to let Steve be with SKWM. Typical of Jason he also wrote and recorded a song that day and left it for us.

My heart is broken, like many of you and I am thinking of his people. I think he knew we loved him. I know he loved all of us. Take some time to love your friends a little harder.




then a few posts below Tim from Bottomless Pit (and formerly Silkworm) remembers Jason too:

http://www.electricalaudio.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=1630722#p1630722

He felt things deeply.

Bottomless Pit's first trips out east/west were due 100% to Mags taking us along for the ride. They wanted someone to do about a month of shows all told, as I recall.

We were, like, uh, how about if we cherry-pick the best three or four shows on each coast and you pay us like we're bringing an extra 100 people in, instead of the 30 we really know we're doing? And they went for it.

Our collective wounds were still fresh in the wake of Michael's death. We were still finding our sea legs, to say the least. It hurt to play.

We took to all of those guys instantly. They made us feel so completely welcome and at home. It was a very soft landing and a great way to get moving. I would have loved to have done more shows with them.

JMo was a hugely enthusiastic, lovable man. He was an unreconstructed weirdo. He was hilarious. Even when he was being a cranky bitch he was pretty funny. I saw him too drunk a couple of times. It was uncomfortable, and I know I didn't see him at his worst.

If that phone call had been "Molina is in town and not uncomfortably drunk" instead of "Molina is dead," we would have dropped everything and spent yesterday evening hanging out. We would have rather done that than made a record.

Dude slept, sweat, and bled music. I would call his obsession with his art pathological, but he had genuine pathologies and now is not the time to be glib.

He was a great writer. He was a great singer.

He didn't know when to quit in either art or life. Couldn't quit, more like it. But I'm not so sure music didn't rescue him and keep him afloat longer than he would have been without it.

I've missed him for a while, now with the unmistakeable extra knife-twist of finality.

Be good to each other. You never know, for better or worse, you never know.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2013, 06:50:50 AM by idlehhhand »

ksuwdboots

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2013, 09:41:20 AM »
Ryan Graveface on Facebook:

I am forever changed and forever grateful for having known Jason Molina and his music. The last 3 Dreamend records would not have existed without him. He was a unique and amazing soul. I am heartbroken.

William Schaff and I have an announcement coming in the next 24 hours in regards to Molina.

rcamps

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Re: musicians write about jason
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2013, 12:48:09 PM »
Hiss Golden Messenger (M.C. Taylor) on Facebook:

I've been a little slow to process the news of Jason Molina’s passing, though many of us that were aware of his trials knew that this was one potential outcome. I was a fan of his work first (which I remain to this day), and then we became friends and we traveled around the country together many times. As a fellow songwriter, his sheer force of will, his confidence and singularity of delivery, his prolificacy—these were inspiring and daunting in equal measure. But he was generous and self-effacing with his gift, and I am certain that he believed in the song as a powerful tool for change, a strong and magical force among the brotherhood of man. He was a rambler and a self-mythologizer in the best, most confounding ways—ways not at all disingenuous, fully convinced of, and welcoming to, the muse. He told me once that he was nervous that if he ever stopped writing—which he did prodigiously—he might walk away from music forever, as though he were simply a vessel. In this line of work, depression and intoxicants are job hazards. And if you’re singing about the dark places of the soul, they’re that much more magnetic. I talked to Jason a couple months ago. He sounded shaky but on the mend. I thought and hoped he was going to make it out alive. I know that his many friends—folks that were much closer to Jason than I was—are devastated and frustrated, and I’m trying to send good thoughts in their direction.

I recognized a kindred spirit in JMo, and now he’s gone to that place of darkness and light that we all sing about so often. And he made it there first—again. Steady on your way, brother. Go easy.